Public and International Affairs

College of Humanities and Social Sciences

Colin Dueck

Colin Dueck

Colin Dueck

Associate Professor

American foreign policy, security studies, international relations

Colin Dueck is an Associate Professor in George Mason University’s Department of Public and International Affairs. He studied politics at Princeton University, and international relations at Oxford under a Rhodes scholarship. He has published two books on American foreign and national security policies, Hard Line: The Republican Party and U.S. Foreign Policy since World War II (Princeton, 2010), and Reluctant Crusaders: Power, Culture, and Change in American Grand Strategy (Princeton, 2006). He has also published articles on these same subjects in journals such as International Security, Orbis, Political Science Quarterly, Review of International Studies, Security Studies, and World Policy Journal. His current research focus is on the relationship between party politics, presidential leadership, American conservatism, and U.S. foreign policy. His broader research and teaching interests are in the history and practice of international strategy and diplomacy. He is the faculty advisor for the Alexander Hamilton Society at George Mason University, and a member of the International Institute for Strategic Studies.

Selected Publications

Hard Line: The Republican Party and U.S. Foreign Policy since World War II (Princeton University Press, 2010) at http://press.princeton.edu/titles/9347.html

Reluctant Crusaders: Power, Culture, and Change in American Grand Strategy (Princeton University Press, 2006)

“Regaining a Realistic Foreign Policy,” Policy Review 162 (August-September 2010)

“The End of the End of History,” Claremont Review of Books (Fall 2009)

“Presidents, Domestic Politics, and Major Military Interventions,” in Neoclassical Realism and the State, Steven Lobell, Norrin Ripsman, and Jeffrey Taliaferro, eds. (Cambridge University Press, 2009)

“Iran’s Nuclear Challenge,” co-authored with Ray Takeyh, Political Science Quarterly 122:2 (Summer 2007)

“Strategies for Managing Rogue States,” Orbis 50:2 (Spring 2006)

“Realism, Culture, and Grand Strategy: Explaining America’s Peculiar Path to World Power,” Security Studies 14:2 (April-June 2005)

“Ideas and Alternatives in American Grand Strategy, 2000-2004,” Review of International Studies 30 (October 2004)

“New Perspectives on American Grand Strategy,” International Security 28:4 (Spring 2004)

“Hegemony on the Cheap: Liberal Internationalism, From Wilson to Bush,” World Policy Journal 20:4 (Winter 2003/2004)

Courses Taught

American foreign policy

International security

War, politics, and strategy

International relations

Conservative political thought